The Spirit of Christmas
Dec17

The Spirit of Christmas

Article submitted by Rachelle Reinking of Heartland Sings In Fort Wayne, we’re lucky to have so many ways to celebrate the holidays. Long-standing events such as the Night of Lights and the Festival of Trees are a must-see every year. If you want to add something new to your list of seasonal activities, check out The Spirit of Christmas at the Allen County Courthouse! Heartland Sings presents this 2nd annual concert as a chance for you to see the courthouse like you’ve never seen it before. From under the rotunda, twenty-four Heartland singers perform a cappella arrangements of classic and contemporary holiday songs. Here is what’s unique about this concert – there aren’t any microphones. The architecture of the courthouse creates the perfect natural acoustics. No matter where you are in the building, the sound resonates in your ears as if you had a front row seat. Mezzo-soprano Ashlee Bickley says, “In drier spaces, singers almost push to project the sound. But in the courthouse, your voice just speaks easily and the harmonies envelop you.” This musical presence captures the magical feeling of Christmas along with the beauty of the building itself. Built in 1902, the Allen County Courthouse features gorgeous Beaux-Arts style architecture with murals, sculptures, marbling, and stained glass. The Allen County Courthouse Preservation Trust hosts the event and is proud to open up the historic landmark to the community for The Spirit of Christmas. During the week the local government and court occupy the building, but this weekend is a great opportunity to experience the acoustics and architecture for yourself. Start a new holiday tradition with The Spirit of Christmas. Performances will take place on Dec. 19th and 20th at 2:00pm and 5:00pm each day. Tickets are $20 General Admission and $10 for Students. Purchase online at www.heartlandsings.org or by phone at...

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Good Samaritan Students on Spring Break
Mar16

Good Samaritan Students on Spring Break

In what has become known as the story of the “Good Samaritan,” one of Jesus’ most famous teachings found in the gospel of Luke 10:25-37, Jesus instructs his followers in the ways of sacrificial service, loving one’s neighbor, and caring for others who may not be able to care for themselves. The story in brief goes like this: a lawyer questions Jesus on the way to eternal life. In response, Jesus gives a parable about a Samaritan man who tends to the physical needs of a victim of an assaulted robbery. The Samaritan and victim couldn’t have been more different. Ethnic, cultural, and religious barriers should have made the two men mortal enemies. But seeing the victim’s need, the Samaritan had compassion on him and served the man, even paying for his medical expenses with his own money. However, before the Samaritan man’s arrival, two other passersby refused to help the beaten man, and turned a blind eye to his apparent needs. It’s a sad truth that still exists today. Many people, aware of the desperate needs of others, refuse to serve out of their own justification. Such is not the way of Jesus. The point of the story? Jesus’ answer to finding eternal life is to “love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength and with all your mind, and to love your neighbor as yourself” (see chapter 10, verse 27). The “Golden Rule” as this is called then, is not so much about “loving others as you would love yourself”, but rather “loving others as you love God”. So how can Christians continue to show love to both neighbor and enemy the way Jesus taught? Well if you are a young adult in Fort Wayne, you can join a community of twenty-something’s committed to being the literal hands and feet of Jesus by serving the marginalized and tangibly meeting the needs of some of the most culturally neglected people groups in our city. Unlike the two other travelers who refused to help the man in need, this young adult generation in Fort Wayne has resolved to put their faith into action and care for our poor and disenfranchised. Parker Crosby, a dynamic young leader and actuary by trade, has organized a Good Samaritan effort for local college students to serve the community on their spring break. For many young people at our area universities, spring break means a carefree week away from school. In an attempt to redeem that time off and create meaningful partnerships among young adult ministries, Parker has put together a week of...

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Jesus, the Gate, and Young Adults Entering into Revival
Feb13

Jesus, the Gate, and Young Adults Entering into Revival

“I continue to dream and pray about a revival of holiness in our day that moves forth in mission and creates authentic community in which each person can be unleashed through the empowerment of the Spirit to fulfill God’s creational intentions.” ― John Wesley, from How to Pray: The Best of John Wesley on Prayer John Wesley, William Carey, Hudson Taylor, Grace Wilder and Lottie Moon: five young men and women, in their mid-twenties, whom God used to start the fires of revival within their respective generation. The legacies of these missionary heroes, of one hundred years ago, burn within the hearts of a new generation seeking revival in our own age. Fort Wayne, known as “the city of churches” currently has several university campuses, dozens of hipster coffee shops, and numerous Christian churches, that are filled with young adults, young professionals, and young families who are not asking the question of whether or not faith is real. Instead, the spiritual question of the day is “does faith work?” Those whom sociologist call “millennials”, or those born between the years of 1982-2002 roughly speaking, represent the largest generation ever to live in American history. Some statisticians say we number close to 80 million! But this is a generation that is incredibly optimistic, seeks an adventure in life, and has a growing interest in the supernatural. If you resonate with the kind of faith I’m describing here; a faith that works, takes risks, expects to see miracles, and is radical enough to desire complete obedience in order to see our city transformed by the power of the Gospel, then I’d encourage you to come check out the Gate. The Gate is Fort Wayne’s new young adult ministry gathering. At the Gate we will seek God’s face in an extended time of worship, reflect on his Word with a practical and relevant teaching, and activate the gifts of the Holy Spirit in a time of prayer ministry. The name “the Gate” is a prophetic reference to John 10:9, and signifies an entry point to a “full life” in Jesus. We exist to equip college students, and twenty-something’s in the following four ways: * Encounter God in prayer and worship * Experience Authentic Community * Engage Your World on Mission * Enter a Full Life in Jesus We are launching our new ministry this Sunday evening, February 15th, from 6 -8:00pm and will meet at Pathway Community Church, located at 11910 Shearwater Run Fort Wayne, IN 46845. Connect with us online and get updates: Twitter @TheGate_FW Instagram @TheGate_FW Facebook      ...

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A Humble Yarn of a Novice Monk at the Indiana Buddhist Temple
Feb10

A Humble Yarn of a Novice Monk at the Indiana Buddhist Temple

Submitted to Living Fort Wayne by the Indiana Buddhist Temple Have you ever thought of dedicating your life towards enlightenment? In this part of the world, this is not a concept that most of us are raised with. For many of us, there comes a point where the only solution to our spiritual dilemma is to ordain as a monastic. For those who are unfamiliar with many of the spiritual paths that are currently available to us, Buddhism is one path that is neatly laid out so that if you walk on the noble eight fold path, you may see the benefits of this spiritual path in this very lifetime. Buddhism is definitely not the only path that can lead to enlightenment but it is one of the most organized spiritual paths that is open to anyone who is interested. There are many other systems available; although some require the assistance of a master, Guru or some sort of esoteric practice that is only available to those who are accepted into that particular system. With Buddhism today, one can learn a technique of meditation from a meditation teacher and practice at home. Even with limited experience, one can still make some progress and develop a more balanced mind when it comes to dealing with the day to day turmoil that all of us face. At a certain point, we will need further instruction. Some will continue doing long retreats of several weeks to several months. There are even many individuals today who go on long retreats of several years without ordaining as a monastic. So why would someone decide to become a monastic and give up the householder life? When ordaining as a monk or nun, you are basically giving yourself over to the Buddha (The teachings that the Buddha left us), Dharma and the Sangha (Holy order of monks and nuns). Dharma is a Pali (a language that was spoken during the time of the Buddha) word that basically means the order of the universe. You can also say that the Dharma means the natural laws of the universe. By taking the robes of a monastic, you are dedicating your life to enlightenment. As a monastic, you are taking the vow to follow the precepts which are given to you during ordination. As a lay Buddhist, it is very common to already follow the five precepts which are: non-harm towards all living beings; not taking anything that isn’t given to you; not having illegal (harmful) sexual relations; not lying (which on a higher level could also be interpreted to not slandering, gossiping or speaking harshly towards others) and...

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Pursuit Fort Wayne Launches First Citywide Event
Nov28

Pursuit Fort Wayne Launches First Citywide Event

Mark December 4th in your calendars, friends! To be specific, go ahead and pencil in “Pursuit Fort Wayne” from 7-9pm that evening. For young adults in the Fort Wayne area hoping to connect with fellow believers, I’ve got wonderful news. A new group called Pursuit Fort Wayne fancies your attendance at its first ever worship event. Brock Orlowski, his wife Abby, and a group of devoted friends planned, prayed, and then planned some more in the months leading up to this point. Their mission is simply to foster a community of young adults pursuing Christ together in Fort Wayne. Pursuit FW is not affiliated with any individual church. Instead, it intends to be a citywide, inter-denominational collective. For the Pursuit FW launch event, young adults in the area are encouraged to join in a night of worship, fellowship and prayer. The Mike Lee Band will lead with their original take on modern worship music. Orlowski and company plan to connect with attendees and cast a vision for the revival of our city. Pursuit Fort Wayne welcomes your presence and participation at its kick-off event. Who: Young adults in Fort Wayne Where: The Summit – Grace Gathering (3157 Minnich Rd, New Haven) When: Thursday, December 4. 7:00pm-9:00pm For more information: Twitter: @Pursuit_FW...

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How the Indiana Buddhist Temple Has Helped Me
Oct31

How the Indiana Buddhist Temple Has Helped Me

Article submitted by Indiana Buddhist Temple, written by Jonathan Buckingham As I was heading out the door of the Indiana Buddhist Temple, feeling peaceful and calm, I was asked to write an essay, on how the temple has helped me. I jumped with excitement inside and was pleased to do so. The temple has supported me in many ways already, but the four things I noticed most is the care of the monks, the sense of community, the benefits of the teachings, and the chance to retreat. With honor in my mind I am proud to explain how the temple has done this. Just a couple of kind words from another person can lighten up the whole day.  I will never forget the questions asked from one of the monks. With a soft, gentle tone in his voice, he asked me, “Are you happy?”  Knowing that someone is interested in my well-being, the question lifted me with a warm smile. I notice the monks at the temple are always speaking in this kind way to everyone. I enjoy just sitting back and listening to them.  It teaches me a feeling of acceptance for myself and others. When a community shows me love, I want to give them love back. I see this cycle as the monks giving compassion to the community and the community wanting to give compassion back to the monks, and on and on. It’s a beautiful cycle! When I go to the temple people are always offering me things: “Please sit,” “Would you like to join use?” “Yes, please rest,” or “Please, come and eat.”  When I interact with people at the temple, I learn more how to do this with everyone I meet. It shows me how giving compassion to another person can go a long way. I get great joy in learning to have a calm mind.  I have been doing meditation on my own for a little while now.  Yet, I can tell my meditation is getting better going to the temple. The temple offers regular group meditation sessions.  One of these sessions I enjoyed was the Loving-Kindness Mediation during the last retreat. The meditation started with the monk helping everyone to become calm. He would say things like, “take a deep breath” or, “feel the joy viewing something pleasant.” As I listened, my body and mind started to become calm. Within a period of time, he would start saying more uplifting words like, “see how much love is inside you,” and “you are a confident person”. When I was in this very relaxed state with someone repeating kind words the love I...

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