Living Fort Wayne Beer and Wine Tour: Chapman’s Brewing Company
Jul05

Living Fort Wayne Beer and Wine Tour: Chapman’s Brewing Company

This is the third stop in the Living Fort Wayne Beer and Wine Tour. Every month we will be featuring a different local brewery or winery from our region. Today, Jake Pickett shares his experience at the headquarters of the fledgling brewery Chapman’s Brewing Company in Angola. First things first. The American Ale Cider brewed by Chapman’s Brewing in Angola is not another hard cider apple-tini in a bottle. As a matter of fact, it comes in a can. And it’s real beer. With a hint of apple. While it’s not for everyone, it’s a unique entry into the craft brew scene that has grabbed the attention of local beer aficionados and novices alike. I took a trip up to Angola with a couple of coworkers to meet the Founder and CEO of Chapman’s Brewing, Scott Fergusson. He welcomed us with a handshake and a smile and led us on a tour of their state-of-the-art facility. This place is immaculate. They have the newest, most modern technology in a modest structure perfectly suited for the production and consumption of beer. They’re open 7 days a week for tours, sampling, and growler fills, or you can grab some cans or a keg to go. And yes, even on Sunday! At the conclusion of the tour we enjoyed several beer samples. We started with the American Ale Cider, which as I mentioned before, has an apple taste to it that isn’t overpowering – you can still tell you’re drinking a fresh beer. This is a good one to have on hand at the sandbar this summer or during a tailgate in the fall. Next we tried the Englishman, which is a Southern English Brown Ale. Think New Castle, but with significantly more flavor and complexity. This was one of the crowd favorites, not too heavy, but certainly not light, and versatile enough for any situation that calls for a tasty beverage. We then sampled the Cream Stout. While it’s technically not “dark beer season” for most, I never have a hard time trying a new Stout or Porter. This was smooth and, as it is appropriately named, creamy – definitely on the heavy side, obviously. We followed that up with the Pail Ale (bonus points for the pun in my book), which had a strong taste of hops, but didn’t venture into the too bitter territory in our opinions. If you’re just starting to get into craft brews and your taste for hoppiness is advancing, then this could be right up your alley. Finally, Scott poured us each a taste of the IPA. This is a beer snob’s beer. It’s not the most bitter beer out...

Read More